Cerberus by P.K. Gallagher – Blog Tour Interview, Guest Post & Giveaway

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cerberusCerberus: Book 1 of Parish by P.K. Gallagher

Paranormal YA Fantasy

 

For Kaeden Parish, life in Solace has always followed certain rules—everything makes sense, everything can be planned for, and everything is as it seems. Unfortunately, the secret harbored by his gorgeous, albeit guarded girlfriend is about to shatter all of that.

After a successful attack on his life opens his eyes to a world of war, shadows, and supernatural creatures—a world he didn’t plan for—Kaeden finds himself resembling the sort of monster he has always feared. As he desperately struggles to resist a new temptation, danger draws ever nearer, threatening the ones he loves most. A prophecy tells of a final battle and great destruction, and Kaeden must decide which side he is on, a choice that could mean the end of the world.

In Book 1 of the Solace Series, P.K. Gallagher pulls readers into a realm where good and evil are at war, and the outcome of it all rests on one young man’s decision to either go and live…or stay and die.

This is where the story of Parish begins.

 

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pkgAuthor P.K. Gallagher

Despite writing stories that take place almost exclusively in New England, speculative young adult fiction author P. K. Gallagher has lived in the suburbs of the south her entire life. It is to this that she attributes her love of the fantastic and the supernatural—writing such things was her only escape from the monotony of Suburbia. Gallagher graduated from Florida A&M University in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a fervent desire to never set foot inside a newsroom again.

She currently lives in Atlanta and divides her time between working a day job, finishing her works in progress, and perfecting her plans for world domination.

 

  1. Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.

It truly is the little things. I woke up one morning and checked my stats, as has become something of a ritual for me, and noticed that a 5-star review had been posted on my book. It wasn’t from one of the bloggers I had approached or an acquaintance to whom I’d mentioned the book—it was a total stranger. That single review represented everything I wanted to get out of being an author: people reading my book and enjoying it. And since it was the first, it will always have a special place in my heart.

 

  1. If you could jump in to a book and live in that world, which would it be?

Does a play count? Because if it does, set me up with a one-way ticket to the Denmark of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. This has less to do with the world, however, and more to do with the title character. To be blunt, I have what some would consider an unhealthy affection for the Prince of Denmark and would love to have been there to save him from both Claudius and himself. 

  1. Is there a song you could list as the theme song for your book or any of your characters?

Music is very important to me, and I seldom write a fast-paced scene without an appropriate song playing in the background. So, as a matter of fact, all of my characters—and most of the scenes—have a musical theme. I won’t go through them all, but the “opening and end credits” if you will are set to Wasteland by 10 Years and Nightmare by Avenged Sevenfold respectively. The basic soundtrack is on a Spotify playlist the can be heard at here.

  • How did you know you should become an author?

  • Can you see yourself in any of your characters?

Definitely. In fact, I would almost go as far as to say that at the core of every character is an aspect of myself. Kaeden inherited the importance I place on family while Genesis received my need to try to save everyone. Imber has my immature streak, and even the slightly twisted part of me that thinks the Saw series is hilarious found a home with one of the antagonists you’ll meet later in the series.

  1. What’s the best advice anyone has ever given you?

I was told once that since there’s nothing anyone can do for me that I can’t do just as well for myself, I should just do it all myself. I’m pretty sure that this is not 100 percent true, but the sentiment was still pretty valuable—while it’s always nice to have others backing you, you should never be afraid to single-handedly undertake an endeavor that you think is worth it.

  1. How do you react to a bad review?

Usually, I just go cry in a corner for a moment while I fight off an existential crisis (I’m kidding, mostly). Receiving bad reviews is awful for the self-esteem but helpful for improving one’s writing. So, after the emotional wounds have ceased stinging, I read negative reviews over and over to see if it contains legitimate criticism and, if so, figure out what I can do to address the issues at hand so as to avoid such reviews next time.

  1. What TV show/movie/book do you watch/read that you’d be embarrassed to admit?

I’m not so much embarrassed that I’ve read the Twilight saga as I am that I’ve read it so many times each copy is falling to pieces. It’s just really easy reading, my go-to when I’m trying to get my mind off of something.

  1. Favorite quote from a movie?

“Our lives are not our own. From womb to tomb, we are bound to others. Past and present. And by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future.”

  1. What is something people would be surprised to know about you?

My second favorite genre of music is country. And no, my first favorite is not “any genre that’s not country.”

  1. Pets? – childhood or adult

My first pets were two fish given to me by my parents so that I could learn responsibility. One died because I didn’t feed them, and the other, while it lasted a little longer by eating the other’s carcass (or at least that’s what I assume since we never found its carcass), died after the tank got too dirty. Now I have two dogs, and I guess I’ve finally learned responsibility because they are 12 years old and still going strong.

  1. What is your favorite scene in the book? Which scene or characters were the most difficult for you to write and why?

My favorite scene is the scene at the rave. It was really fun to write and gave me the chance to play around with a lot of different elements. The hardest scene to write—or scenes, shall, I say—is really any one with Genesis in it. She was a surprisingly troublesome character. Because the primary point of view is Kaeden’s, you really don’t get to see a lot of who Genesis is and what makes her tick, and so it is really easy to take Kaeden’s side in all situations. Genesis is a guarded sort of person who doesn’t open up easily, so opportunities for characterization are fairly rare and you seldom see everything she does to try to please everyone. Next book, she’ll be in the spotlight a little more, so people will get much more insight into who she is, but in this installment, I had real trouble portraying her in such a way that dissuades readers from vilifying her, which, I won’t deny, can be easy to do. 

  1. Do you like the spotlight or lurking in the shadows?

I like being in the spotlight for speeches and things like that, but having to engage in small talk with a smaller group triggers a mini-panic attack every time. 

  1. What is next on your to read list?

Dr. Sleep, by Stephen King

  1. Craziest thing you ever ate?

When I went to Jamaica earlier this year, a street vendor killed a sea snail in front of me, castrated it, chopped it up, and tossed with tomatoes and peppers. It was surprisingly delicious.  

  1. How do you feel about banned books? Do you have a favorite?

While I do not have a favorite, I don’t believe in the banning of books. Attempting to ban them is attempting to stop the spread of ideas and independent thought. For me, that is the worst type of tyranny. 

  1. Do your characters really talk to you?

Yes. God, they won’t shut up. But it’s just as well. Talking out problems with them is actually how I get over writer’s block. 

  1. Where is your favorite spot to write?

I used to frequent a park at Place d’Italie in France. There was something about the sound of nearby traffic, water from the fountain, and indistinct French that made my muse thrive. 

  1. What drives you insane about the writing process?

Editing. There’s nothing quite as maddening as reading a scene you thought was pure gold while you were writing it only to discover that it’s riddled with errors and awkward patches. You’re no longer shaping and molding your creation so much as you’re hammering out imperfections, which takes decidedly more work.

  1. Write a Haiku about your book

The price of secrets

When one has faith in little

Leaves only ruins


This or That: P.K.

TV or Movies?

TV—I have a really short attention span.


Hot or Cold?

Cold


Night owl, or early bird?

Night owl


Print or Ebook?

Print


Chocolate or Vanilla?

Vanilla


Regular or Diet?

Regular


Coke or Pepsi?

Coke


Horror or Romance?

Porque no las dos!


Action or Drama?

Drama


Pizza or Pasta?

Pasta


Skittles or M&Ms?

Skittles


Sweet or Salty?

Salty


Summer or Winter?

Winter


City or Country?

City


Harry Potter or Twilight?

Harry Potter


Gum or Breath Mints?

Gum


Spontaneity or Planning Ahead?

Spontaneity


PC or Mac?

PC!


Beach or Pool?

Pool (I hate sand)


Shoes or Sandals?

Shoes


Cats or Dog?

DOGS!


Apples or Oranges?

Apples (Granny Smith)


Cause or Effect?

Effect


Heads or Tails?

Tails


Facebook or Twitter?

Facebook


Truth or Dare?

Dare


Text or Talk?

Text

 

Introvert or Extrovert?

Introvert


This or That: Kaeden

 

TV or Movies?

Movies


Hot or Cold?

Hot

 

Night owl, or early bird?

Early bird


Chocolate or Vanilla?

Chocolate


Regular or Diet?

Regular


Coke or Pepsi?

Coke


Action or Drama?

Action


Pizza or Pasta?

Pizza


Skittles or M&Ms?

Skittles


Sweet or Salty?

Salty


Summer or Winter?

Summer


City or Country?

City
Spontaneity or Planning Ahead?
Planning ahead

 

PC or Mac?

PC


Beach or Pool?

Beach


Shoes or Sandals?

Shoes
Cats or Dog?
Cats

 

Apples or Oranges?
Oranges

 

Cause or Effect?
Effect

 

Heads or Tails?
Heads

 

Facebook or Twitter?

Facebook
Truth or Dare?
Truth

 

Text or Talk?

Talk

 

Introvert or Extrovert?

Extrovert

 


Top Fives

 

Bookish Pet Peeves

5. When people bend the cover of a paperback behind the book

4. When people complain that a book doesn’t have their favorite parts from the movie adaptation

3. When someone sees me reading and says, “Good, you’re not busy.”

2. When I lend out a book, and it’s returned in worse condition than when I loaned it.

1. When people write in library books

Things that bring a smile to your face

5. Small, fuzzy animals

4. Movies that do justice to things that make me fangirl

3. Positive book reviews from people I don’t know

2. Cute boys reading books

1. Nerd humor

 

Guest Post

You get a lot of different reactions when you tell people you’re a writer. You get those infuriating questions like, “No, I mean what do you do for a living?” and “Do people even read anymore?” You’ll get the would-be collaborators who’d love to give you a story idea or two in exchange for a cut of the profits or—and this one’s the worst—unsolicited advice from people who have barely ever dotted Ts and crossed Is, let alone written a story.

Now, next to the others, that doesn’t sound so bad. The people making the suggestions do mean well, after all, and are typically just trying to be supportive. However, bad advice can cause years of trouble and frustration if an inexperienced writer happens to heed it.

For me, that advice came from my eighth grade English teacher. “Write what you know,” she was fond of saying, “and you’ll never be steered wrong.”

I believe this is perhaps the worst piece of advice I’ve ever received.

It’s not that I don’t think drawing from one’s own experiences can be helpful—that’s not what I’m saying at all. However, I do not believe in boxes. In fact, I believe that the worst thing a writer can do is put his or herself into one.

I grew up in the suburbs of eight different cities. Believe me, I know all about Suburbia.  I also know I that I don’t want to write about it. I don’t want to write about the small-town drama that characterized my adolescence or about making my own fun as a child. I knew this for certain even during those years I spent following my teacher’s advice and “writing what I know.” All the while, I wanted to write about life or death situations, about high tension and high stakes, about all the exciting things that never happened in my corner of Suburbia. I think writing speculative fiction was really the only option for a writer like me, but I resisted that for years because of my teacher’s advice.

I think my point is just that it’s easy for writers, especially new ones, to blindly follow the advice of those that seem to know better. What I discovered, though, is that there are no absolutes in writing, and no one piece of advice fits every author.

As a speculative fiction author, I find that there’s nothing quite as liberating as creating my own worlds and watching them grow. There’s a freedom that comes from creating something totally new, and I’m much more comfortable doing that than limiting myself to only  those things I’m familiar with.

 

It’s why I created Solace. I could have easily set my novel Cerberus—and the sequels in progress—in an actual town, but it was much more fun creating my own. Solace has maps, a history, everything a real town has, and I was able to make it exactly what I wanted it to be. There’s so much you can do when you’re limited only by your imagination, and for me that’s what it’s all about.

 

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Blog Tour Giveaway

$25 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash

Ends 10/25/13

Open only to those who can legally enter, receive and use an Amazon.com Gift Code or Paypal Cash. Winning Entry will be verified prior to prize being awarded. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 or older to enter or have your parent enter for you. The winner will be chosen by rafflecopter and announced here as well as emailed and will have 48 hours to respond or a new winner will be chosen. This giveaway is in no way associated with Facebook, Twitter, Rafflecopter or any other entity unless otherwise specified. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. Giveaway was organized by Kathy from I Am A Reader, Not A Writer and sponsored by the author. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW.

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